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During the nineteen-eighties, while Iraqis and Iranians killed one another the hundreds of thousands...

The New Yorker     |    August 17, 1992     |    NOTES AND COMMENT

During the nineteen-eighties,while Iraqis and Iranians killed one another by the hundreds of thousands in a struggle for supremacy in the Persian Gulf, the United States maintained a vigilant neutrality-or so Americans were assured by the governments they elected.
 
Tags: Iraq

Less than a year after Americans paraded in the streets to celebrate victory in the Gulf War...

The New Yorker     |    May 25, 1992     |    NOTES AND COMMENT

Less than a year after Americans paraded in the streets to celebrate victory in the Gulf War, the entire conflict, which appeared so cataclysmic at the time, is rapidly receding from view.
 
Tags: Iraq

Postcards from History

Aperture     |    WINTER 1992     |    ESSAY

Cover Rarely has the portal, the moment of passage from ordinary to revolutionary time, been so well captured in a single image: At the wheel of the gray BMW sits the young dictator, well-dressed, prosperous, slightly overweight, his face impassive, his shoulders thrown back; he has spent all but five of his thirty-four years in the Palace, fifteen of them as President-for-Life, having been inaugurated, at his dying father's insistence, as a mountainously obese, glassy-eyed teenager.
 
Tags: Haiti

With the publication of Oliver North's memoirs...

The New Yorker     |    December 31, 1991     |    NOTES AND COMMENT

With the publication of Oliver North's memoirs and the start of the Colonel's nineteen-city tour to promote it, the Iran-Contra affair completed a five-year journey from tragedy to farce and began its inevitable transformation into "product."
 
Tags: Iran-Contra

Two weeks ago, when Haitian soldiers deposed their country's President...

The New Yorker     |    October 21, 1991     |    NOTES AND COMMENT

Two weeks ago, when Haitian soldiers deposed their country's President, jean-Bertrand Aristide, the United States reacted quickly and forcefully, cutting off foreign aid and freezing Haiti's assets in this country.
 
Tags: Haiti

To Haiti, With Love and Squalor

The New York Times     |    August 11, 1991     |    BOOK REVIEW

Herbertgold Driving south in Haiti one day in the spring of 1986, I passed a great 18-wheeled tractor-trailer speeding north, heard a volley of automatic weapons fire, and, craning my neck to look back, witnessed an absurd and amazing tableau...
 
Tags: Haiti

It is an axiom of governance that power, once acquired, is seldom freely relinquished...

The New Yorker     |    July 29, 1991     |    NOTES AND COMMENT

Though the Cold War no longer casts its shadow over us, our government has shown little eagerness to surrender the powers it claimed under cover of that shadow.
 
Tags: CIA | Foreign Affairs

Like an untreated infection within the political system, the Iran Contra affair continues to grow...

The New Yorker     |    June 17, 1991     |    NOTES AND COMMENT

Like an untreated infection within the political system, the Iran-Contra affair continues to grow, spreading corruption not only into the future but, oddly, back into the past as well.
 
Tags: Iran-Contra

Three months after United States Marines liberated Kuwait City, the victors of Operation Desert Storm...

The New Yorker     |    June 03, 1991     |    NOTES AND COMMENT

Three months after United States Marines liberated Kuwait City, the victors of Operation Desert Storm are still being honored across the country.
 
Tags: middle east | Iraq

In November, a year after the Berlin Wall was breached, American troops and airmen by the thousand...

The New Yorker     |    January 21, 1991     |    NOTES AND COMMENT

In November, a year after the Berlin Wall was breached, American troops and airmen by the thousand began leaving the German bases they had occupied for four decades and heading for the Persian Gulf.
 
Tags: Foreign Affairs | Cold War

For almost four months, the United States has been sleepwalking toward war...

The New Yorker     |    December 10, 1990     |    NOTES AND COMMENT

For almost four months, the United States has been sleepwalking toward war. Though there are the trappings of a debate -- hearings in Congress, argument and speculation on the editorial pages, discussion on the public-affairs programs -- thus far they have seemed insubstantial when set against the reality of President Bush's military buildup
 
Tags: middle east | Iraq

A year after the Berlin Wall was breached...

The New Yorker     |    November 19, 1990     |    NOTES AND COMMENT

A year after the Berlin Wall was breached and the "post Cold War era" proclaimed, Americans face the prospect of a "hot war" fought against an enemy that a few months ago they didn't know they had.
 
Tags: Foreign Affairs | Cold War

Though the rhetoric surrounding the Middle East crisis has softened somewhat since the threats of mid-August...

The New Yorker     |    October 01, 1990     |    NOTES AND COMMENT

Though the rhetoric surrounding the Middle East crisis has softened somewhat since the threats of mid-August, the United States and Iraq remain caught in what President Mitterrand has called the "logic of war."
 
Tags: Foreign Affairs

The great public scandals of the last decade are remarkable, above all, for their inconclusiveness...

The New Yorker     |    September 24, 1990     |    NOTES AND COMMENT

The last great public scandals of the decade are remarkable, above all, for their inconclusiveness, their strange resistance to closure.
 
Tags: Iran-Contra

Americans tend to examine distant regimes, and the commitments our government has made to them, only during times of crisis...

The New Yorker     |    September 10, 1990     |    NOTES AND COMMENT

Americans tend to examine distant regimes, and the commitments our government has made to them, only during times of crisis.
 
Tags: middle east | Iraq

Just past ten on a sunny morning last month in Port-au-Prince...

The New Yorker     |    July 16, 1990     |    NOTES AND COMMENT

Just past ten on a sunny morning last month in Port-au-Prince, four men carrying automatic weapons, two of whom wore the green uniforms of the Haitian Army, strolled into the garden of the Hotel Santos, where Haiti's Council of State was meeting with union and business leaders, and asked for Dr. Louis Roy.
 
Tags: Haiti

Beyond the Mountains (Part III)

The New Yorker     |    December 11, 1989     |    A REPORTER AT LARGE

121189 On February 7,1986, the day the dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier and his wife, Michèle Bennett, flew off to exile in France, a crowd of jubilant Haitians invaded the National Cemetery, a vast expanse of concrete crammed with bright-colored tombs — ivory and turquoise and rose --  bearing the names of Haiti's great families.
 
Tags: Haiti

Beyond the Mountains (Part II)

The New Yorker     |    December 04, 1989     |    A REPORTER AT LARGE

120489 A few weeks after the fall of Jean-Claude Duvalier, in February, 1986, the statue of Christopher Columbus presiding over the harbor of Port-au-Prince was seized and thrown into the sea by persons unknown, who left fastened on the empty pedestal a sheet of paper with a simple scrawled message: "Pa de blans en Hayti!"
 
Tags: Haiti

Beyond the Mountains (Part I)

The New Yorker     |    November 27, 1989     |    A REPORTER AT LARGE

Haiticoverpart1 Mornings in Port au-Prince, just before dawn, as the last, scattered gunshots faded in the distance and the outlines of the city began to take shape in the dirty air—tiny houses, painted aqua and salmon; the huge and ghostly National Palace, gleaming white; gray and rust-colored slums, canopied in smoke—my colleagues and I would go off in search of bodies.
 
Tags: Haiti

Rescuing a Tattered Word--'liberal'

The New York Times     |    January 08, 1989     |    BOOK REVIEW

Having ferreted out the ''sophisticated rebels'' of Europe from Cardiff to Cracow, H. Stuart Hughes found himself rather nonplussed when asked to suggest their counterparts in the United States.
 
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